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PHOTOLOG: old glass, Tamron 19mm fixed focal length f3.5-22

[Photolog] 

analog lenses, circa 1989

by Reviewer Rob

More analog lenses.

Here’s my manual-focus 19mm Tamron f3.5 to 22 that I bought new in 1989 or so, when it was modern technology. I got it down at either George’s North Park or Nelson’s in Little Italy. I forget for sure which it was but I’m pretty sure it was Nelson’s. I loved this lens for so long because of the strange fisheye effect it gave when shooting in crowds. Groups of people could fit in a shot and I never had to walk backward a step to get the shot. So I used all the time, especially in nightclubs with a flash at f8 and 400 ISO, until going digital in 2005. I set it aside ten years ago during the whole switch from 35mm to digital ut I’m going to begin playing around with it again now. Here it is mounted on my Nikon D5200.

One nice thing about this 19mm fixed focal length Tamron is its compact profile. It’s less bulky to carry and it fits well in almost any camera bag space. My heavy digital autofocus 10 to 24mm has a lot wider angle but the thing is almost as long and fat as the camera body it mounts on, so the 19mm’s snubnose profile has its advantages when shooting in a crowd too. I especially like the way the focusing collar is rigid and stays preset no matter how much it gets swung around. All I have to do is get within a certain margin of distance from a subject in some place like a crowded dark nightclub or a wedding reception dance floor and I don’t even have to check the focus because I know at f8 with a flash they’ll be sufficiently sharp. Makes for fast photos and great candids. #oldglass #analog #nondigitallensesrule

Hello old friend: Tamron 19mm fixed, f3.5
Hello old friend: Tamron 19mm fixed, f3.5
I like this old Tamron wide angle's stubby profile.
I like this old Tamron wide angle’s stubby profile.
Shot about ten inches away from the mirror, so about twenty inches away from the subject in focus: me. This was believe it or not my main lens for years between 1989 when I got it to 2005 when I went digital. I was so in love with that strange fisheyed effect, especially for crowd grab shots. Haha, something to grow out of I guess.
Shot about ten inches away from the mirror, so about twenty inches away from the subject in focus: me. This was believe it or not my main lens for years between 1989 when I got it to 2005 when I went digital. I was so in love with that strange fisheyed effect, especially for crowd grab shots. Haha, something to grow out of I guess.
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I’m Not Really An Unintentional Luddite

[Confession]

An Unintentional Luddite?

by Reviewer Rob, from 5-29-16, 5:41 p.m.

Right Now.

Now I’m listening to this Sub Pop label sampler in my car CD player.

This is going to sound rightfully dumb, but it is almost June 2016 and this is the very first time I have ever heard a compact disc in my car radio. Don’t bother asking why eithet, but I have never listened to CDs in my own automobiles until this very moment. Crazy, huh?

Twenty or even eighteen years ago I would listen while driving to lots of review submissions that I copied or had been mailed in, but they were always tape cassettes. Then by the mid to late 90’s CDs took over and so did Reviewer magazine as a source of music reviews for new artists and the discs came flooding in. Then cars stopped having tape players and boom boxed stopped having dual tape cassette copiers with CD players. So I guess I got rebellious. I stopped trying, and I stopped caring. I would only sit down with a boom box to listen to a music CD for review purposes and not to relax, or during my ample time while in a car.

Maybe I’m wack crazy but I think I partially justified it by rationalizing the CDs would skip when I drove over a bump.

Amazing but I had never analyzed this before now either, but there you go.

Make Sub Pop Great Again label catalog comp, front.
Make Sub Pop Great Again label catalog comp, front.
Make Sub Pop Great Again label catalog comp, back.
Make Sub Pop Great Again label catalog comp, back.
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on TTL-less high-speed lenses

[Update]

photolog: 50mm f1.4

by Reviewer Rob

I was shooting photos in a bar (Casbah SD) and on the street last night with 1970’s Nikon lens technology mounted on my sturdy D5200. Even before I went digital 11 years ago I preferred either 200mm or wide-angle fisheye lenses so this 50mm has been stored in my camera bag with only intermittent usage since like 1991, for a long long time, but I finally decided to break it out for novelty purposes and to begin taking advantage of its f1.4 capability again for low light environments. I like the way things look but you just have to do everything like flash and focus manually of course and not through the camera’s ttl system.


My old school glass,
My old school glass.

I think this band was called Idylwyld, and that the singer mentioned something about Scotland...
I think this band was called Idylwyld, and that the singer mentioned something about Scotland…
50mm, f1.4, about 200th/sec, really high ISO
50mm, f1.4, about 200th/sec, really high ISO
with camera flash, stopped down to like f8 at maybe 250th of a sec
with camera flash, stopped down to like f8 at maybe 250th of a sec
camera flash reduced, at f1.4 and 250th of a sec, I think... lots of Photoshop balancing here...
camera flash reduced, at f1.4 and 250th of a sec, I think… lots of Photoshop balancing here…
Casbah urinal stickers, at f1.4, manally everything.
Casbah urinal stickers, at f1.4, manally everything.
One of the main reasons to visit the Casbah SD of course is to view the outstanding wall art in the hallway. Here's one of the posters announcing an upcoming show... shot at f1.4, handheld at ISO 25600 and 250th of a second...
One of the main reasons to visit the Casbah SD of course is to view the outstanding wall art in the hallway. Here’s one of the posters announcing an upcoming show… shot at f1.4, handheld at ISO 25600 and 250th of a second…

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Joining The Cloud

On The Adobe Creative Cloud

by Reviewer Rob

So I finally caved and joined Adobe’s Creative Cloud and bought into their downloadable suite of apps. I’m going to try it month to month at first but I’m pretty sure it’ll only take a few weeks before I want to save $25 per month and go for the one year subscription.

I don’t really like being tied to the internet for my apps though. I feel like I’m being watched too much. I want the privacy of having stand-alone software. But change with the times I must.

Thing is it takes forever to download this stuff! The initial manager app was relatively fast — at least the monitor bar was visibly moving — but after installing Photoshop as the first one inDesign taking an hour and it’s only 10 percent complete.

Still there’s a lot of packages here I want to use. Premium video editing, Lightroom, Muse (whatever that is)… there’s like over half a dozen things on this list that I’ve never opened before. But first I have to get them downloaded.

Finally joining The Cloud.
Finally joining The Cloud.
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cybersecurity predictions for 2016

[Scary Email]

“WE ARE MOVING TOWARDS DEVASTATION…”
TALK TO THE CYBER SECURITY MASTER

GET A PREVIEW OF 2016’S
CYBER PREDICTIONS 
CYBER SECURITY EXPERT: Michael Daugherty, is a Senior Writer for Cyber Defense Magazine and is a Board Member at Snoopwall the powerhouse cyber-security firm. He is author of The Devil Inside the Beltway: The Shocking Expose of the US Government’s Surveillance and Overreach Into Cyber-security, Medicine and Small Business.
Last year I quoted late, great sage and Hall of Fame baseball player Yogi Berra. Yogi once noted, “It’s tough to make predictions especially about the future.”
Fortunately, for me, mine for 2015 were accurate. And so I will venture out to again make predictions, many of which should be considered warnings, for 2016 — as I remain all the while cognizant of the words of the Chinese philosopher La Tzu that “those who have knowledge, don’t predict. Those who predict don’t have knowledge.”