2018 plans

[Print Lives On]

Happy New Year

We survived, but 2017 sure sucked didn’t it.

by Reviewer Rob

I should probably address this first — happy new year, by the way — before I get into any explanations. I recognize that especially after 2016, 2017 was a tumultuous year for many people, MOST people, probably. Stories in the news, and I won’t get into the list of them, floored everyone. Things happening in Washington D.C. that filtered down into the cultural ethos have been enough to make the most optimistic among us consider moving into a cabin in the woods.

In 2017 I wrote a blog post announcing the demise of Reviewer’s print version. That was impulsive and unwise. At the time it seemed like maybe an appropriate time for a big change like that. I had and have other ideas for print I could implement (it’s all about, you can guess it, the money) and I was planning to relocate to a different city (San Diego’s gotten really expensive to rent in if you haven’t noticed), perhaps move to a different region altogether. I was looking for a fresh start. But now I know after thoughtful reflection that I can’t abandon Reviewer Magazine like that. I have too much investment in the idea of The First Amendment to let these recent social shifts unmoor Reviewer as a print venue, even ones as cataclysmic as what have happened in the last year or even ten years.

So let me put that to rest right now. I’ve changed my mind. I can’t abandon this baby. Reviewer Magazine is NOT dead as a printed publication. It’s just taking a vacation.

When I announced it would cease printing but stay online as a blog I was juggling many conflicting plans and intentions and the magazine had been going consistently for 20 years and had printed 50 issues, and those seemed like nice round numbers at which to stop and make a change of direction. I had started the “review” format back in the mid-1990’s before sites that crowd-sourced reviews of everything from music and movies to your local plumber became common and the concept appeared revolutionary in its simplicity. I wanted to print a newer type of magazine after publishing 50 issues, delve into other types of print publishing. But I can still do that. I just don’t want to drop off Reviewer Magazine at the orphanage.

When I started Reviewer in 1996 it was on a small light board in my second floor one-room Pacific Beach studio apartment where I would layout the Bristol paper pages with scotch tape and shrunken typewriter copy I’d xerox late at night at the Garnet Avenue Kinko’s. It was in black and white and I didn’t know that photos had to be half-toned. The printer had to inform me of things like that. Issue one was printed at 10,000 copies and was as much of a thrill as I could imagine. Contributing to the community Zeitgeist via print is a feeling of fulfillment that comes from knowing you’re doing what you’re meant to do.

Everything journalism-related is a review anyway, be it feature, news, or opinion. “This is what we know now, this is what we don’t know yet” — it’s a structure that meshes well with the ‘who-what-where-when-why-and-how’ upside-down pyramid of the basic news story.

But although digital print production has grown considerably easier than cut-and-paste layout, the computer revolution changed the newspaper and magazine advertising economy in ways that many saw coming but few were willing to accept in the early days of the late-twentieth century. Oh, there’s still a market for print. It’s just a downsized shadow of its former self. If you can accept that and move ahead of it then you can still do the job and be happy. I choose to be happy.

So getting back to the point: Look for another print issue from Reviewer Magazine relatively soon in 2018. When exactly I’m not sure. But if you’d like a deal on an ad let me know. 🙂

~RR

Another year has gone and a new one has arrived. But it's hard to find anyone who is sad to see the sun set on 2017.
Another year has gone and a new one has arrived. But it’s hard to find anyone who is sad to see the sun set on 2017.

Local Print By Locals

"Free" on the flier rack!
“Free” on the flier rack!

[Printed Matter]

When Fliers Ruled

by Reviewer Rob

So I was at Gelato Vero on India and Washington last night for a quick cup of scooped espresso and picked up a Soda Bar schedule for November. The “FREE” on its nominal folded cover is what caight my eye. Well of course it’s free, it’s on a flier rack. But it reminded me of a small 90’s zine or chapbook. Gelato Vero is one of those last standing places in town with a reliable flier rack that has room for newsprint magazines. Only a few years ago after handsets took over there were still flier and zine racks in almost every shop and bar. Not now. I was driving up Fifth Avenue yesterday afternoon after some business downtown and was about to turn right on the corner near where Off The Record used to be (they used to have the ALL TIME BEST ZINE AND ALT-PUB RACK EVER) and stopped at that Greek food place across from Buffalo Exchange. No more zine and flier racks in Flashbacks and Buffalo Exchamge anymore either. WTF? Fliers and zines still rule over digital media. When someone takes the time to design, make, print, and distribute a flier… you know there’s substance there that the average keyboard jockey clicking a mouse over a screen doesn’t have, or doesn’t want to put out. I mourn the loss of the flier and zine rack. I also salute those stalwart venues that still maintain them. You guys rule. We need to bring back the zine rack. Russian socio-political engineers would find fixing an election much more difficult, I bet, if local media was still dominated by locals.

  Soda Bar flier. Check out the music genre legend. The symbol for Indie music is a pair of black-rimmed glasses. lol
Soda Bar flier. Check out the music genre legend. The symbol for Indie music is a pair of black-rimmed glasses. lol
Closeup of the Soda Bar schedule's genre legend. Instructions for the music scene novice. Know your tunes!
Closeup of the Soda Bar schedule’s genre legend. Instructions for the music scene novice. Know your tunes!

Issue 50, Reviewer Magazine, in print

Reviewer in print, #50, the pdf link

Reviewer Magazine, issue 50, is out now with the Oregon Militia Standoff, The Cannabis Grower’s Tale, movie reviews, some music, Las Vegas Adult Entertainment Expo 2016 photos, and more. Going on it’s twentieth year. Check us out here –> http://reviewermag.com/print/50/.

There’s a set of high rez jpegs too for this. I should include access to those too. Gimme a day or so. ~Rob

Reviewer Magazine issue 50, pdf link.
Reviewer Magazine issue 50, pdf link.

printed matter: DTLV

Where To Go In Sin City Once You’ve Lost Your Money

print review by Reviewer Rob

DTLV Approx. 5×7”, similar to the Urbanist in San Diego, only more low-budget printing. I like it. This free hand-out guide is a colored xeroxed style folded info sheet of local happenings around the very hip and artsy Downtown “Arts District” which is still affordably cool and not yet too hipstery or upscale to be unattainable to the normal budget. It’s Las Vegas, after all. If you want to be a high roller you can go to the Bellagio or several other places that cater to the whales and oil barons. This is for the cool crowd that like the kitch and appoachability of real art shows and off duty strippers waking up at the corner coffee shop. Wear your sunglasses. The sun will be bright. [dtlv.com] RR


July, 2015, copy of DTLV that I picked up at the photo studio of Curtis Walker in Las Vegas.
July, 2015, copy of DTLV that I picked up at the photo studio of Curtis Walker in Las Vegas.

More Money For Public Education Instead Of Banksters

L.A. Museum Of Natural History: Money Well Spent

by Reviewer Rob

Went to the Museum of Natural history in Los Angeles in November. If you haven’t been there recently their current exhibit is Grandes Maestros and is running through September 13, 2015. Below are some photos I shot of the main exhibit hall, which is an engrossing experience in itself. The Aztec, Mayan and Toltec art room is worth an hour of any art lovers time, and the hall of taxidermied dioramas has plenty of well-lit photo ops. It’s is a fun value for kids young and old. More public funding – federal, state and local – should be put into museums and libraries, instead of the crooked banksters. Seriously, dollar for dollar public education is better.

:::

Pictures below, starting at the top: Aztec figurines from the pre-Columbian art room, the iconic and well-known dinosaur exhibit installed in the main room you first enter when coming into the museum, a solid gold “bat” firgurine in the Aztec room about the size of an adult’s open hand, Miss Piccard with a stuffed adult male polar bear looming over her in the taxidermy room. All photos by ReviewerPhoto.com.

Pre-Columbian Aztec figurines. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Pre-Columbian Aztec figurines. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Dinosaur fossil installation in the entryway to The Los Angeles Museum Of Natural History. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Dinosaur fossil installation in the entryway to The Los Angeles Museum Of Natural History. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Solid gold Aztec "bat" figure. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Solid gold Aztec “bat” figure. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Stuffed Polar Bear shown stalking prey. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.
Stuffed Polar Bear shown stalking prey. Photo by ReviewerPhoto.com.