In Print

 

PDFs of recent issues of Reviewer Magazine in print:

#50,

#49,

#48,

#47,

#46,

#45,

#44,

#43,

#42,

#41

#40,

#39,

#38

 

:::

New Year Weed Laws & California Cannabis News

[Repost]

2018 New Year Recreational Cannabis Guide

“FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOR PEOPLE NEW TO CANNABIS”

What’s the difference between cannabis, marijuana, flower and weed?

Nothing! These words are interchangeable, but cannabis is the scientific term. Marijuana, flower, and weed are all used in a variety of conversational situations to refer to cannabis.

Where can I smoke?

Marijuana must be consumed in a private place. Smoking, eating or otherwise using marijuana in public is still illegal.

Is marijuana lab tested?

Testing will be required starting Jan 1, 2018 for any cannabis harvested on/after Jan. 1 or any cannabis product manufactured on/after Jan 1.

I don’t want to get high, but want to use cannabis medicinally, what should I look for?

CBD is a popular option for those looking to get the medical benefits of cannabis without the high. CBD products are available in most cannabis product types, from vape cartridges to topicals.

I don’t want to inhale smoke, but want to enjoy a cannabis high, what should I try?

Vape pens, edibles, drinks and tinctures are a great way to enjoy the benefits of cannabis without smoking.

Can I walk into a dispensary on Jan. 1, 2018 and buy marijuana?

Yes, if you’re 21 or 18 you can access cannabis recreationally or medically, respectively. Keep in mind, however, that while marijuana is legal for adults in the state of California, local counties and municipalities also have their own set of rules that regulate how retail businesses operate.

Can I still get Medical Cannabis?

Yes, if you’re over the age of 18 physicians may still recommend medical cannabis. Depending upon the condition, people under 18 can obtain a recommendation with their parent or guardian’s permission. California medical patients will need to obtain an ID card issued by the Department of Health.

[The above copy is from
weedmaps.com
, 1-4-18. ~Editor]

2028: recreational cannabis is here in California.

2028: recreational cannabis is here in California.

Reviewer Magazine will still be here in 2018

[Print Lives On]

Happy New Year

We survived, but 2017 sure sucked didn’t it.

by Reviewer Rob

I should probably address this first — happy new year, by the way — before I get into any explanations. I recognize that especially after 2016, 2017 was a tumultuous year for many people, MOST people, probably. Stories in the news, and I won’t get into the list of them, floored everyone. Things happening in Washington D.C. that filtered down into the cultural ethos have been enough to make the most optimistic among us consider moving into a cabin in the woods.

In 2017 I wrote a blog post announcing the demise of Reviewer’s print version. That was impulsive and unwise. At the time it seemed like maybe an appropriate time for a big change like that. I had and have other ideas for print I could implement (it’s all about, you can guess it, the money) and I was planning to relocate to a different city (San Diego’s gotten really expensive to rent in if you haven’t noticed), perhaps move to a different region altogether. I was looking for a fresh start. But now I know after thoughtful reflection that I can’t abandon Reviewer Magazine like that. I have too much investment in the idea of The First Amendment to let these recent social shifts unmoor Reviewer as a print venue, even ones as cataclysmic as what have happened in the last year or even ten years.

So let me put that to rest right now. I’ve changed my mind. I can’t abandon this baby. Reviewer Magazine is NOT dead as a printed publication. It’s just taking a vacation.

When I announced it would cease printing but stay online as a blog I was juggling many conflicting plans and intentions and the magazine had been going consistently for 20 years and had printed 50 issues, and those seemed like nice round numbers at which to stop and make a change of direction. I had started the “review” format back in the mid-1990’s before sites that crowd-sourced reviews of everything from music and movies to your local plumber became common and the concept appeared revolutionary in its simplicity. I wanted to print a newer type of magazine after publishing 50 issues, delve into other types of print publishing. But I can still do that. I just don’t want to drop off Reviewer Magazine at the orphanage.

When I started Reviewer in 1996 it was on a small light board in my second floor one-room Pacific Beach studio apartment where I would layout the Bristol paper pages with scotch tape and shrunken typewriter copy I’d xerox late at night at the Garnet Avenue Kinko’s. It was in black and white and I didn’t know that photos had to be half-toned. The printer had to inform me of things like that. Issue one was printed at 10,000 copies and was as much of a thrill as I could imagine. Contributing to the community Zeitgeist via print is a feeling of fulfillment that comes from knowing you’re doing what you’re meant to do.

Everything journalism-related is a review anyway, be it feature, news, or opinion. “This is what we know now, this is what we don’t know yet” — it’s a structure that meshes well with the ‘who-what-where-when-why-and-how’ upside-down pyramid of the basic news story.

But although digital print production has grown considerably easier than cut-and-paste layout, the computer revolution changed the newspaper and magazine advertising economy in ways that many saw coming but few were willing to accept in the early days of the late-twentieth century. Oh, there’s still a market for print. It’s just a downsized shadow of its former self. If you can accept that and move ahead of it then you can still do the job and be happy. I choose to be happy.

So getting back to the point: Look for another print issue from Reviewer Magazine relatively soon in 2018. When exactly I’m not sure. But if you’d like a deal on an ad let me know. 🙂

~RR

Another year has gone and a new one has arrived. But it's hard to find anyone who is sad to see the sun set on 2017.

Another year has gone and a new one has arrived. But it’s hard to find anyone who is sad to see the sun set on 2017.

Millions For Drone Tech In Poway

General Atomics Poway drones will multiply in 2018.

General Atomics Poway drones will multiply in 2018.

Poway Drones

Huge General Atomics Contracts In The Works

by Reviewer Rob

When I was a kid in the early-1970’s and my mom worked for a realty company on Poway Road houses were going for about 20 thousand a piece. Now that things have changed and there’s plenty of million-dollar homes dotting the hills above the Poway valley that economic surge will only grow larger this year since General Atomics is getting $328.8 million for their MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial systems programs. The hills south of Poway Road had undeveloped archeological sites rumored to be replete with Indian burial grounds. Now the drones made there will be haunting the skies over Afghanistan and elsewhere.

According to this article on the UPI wire:

‘The MQ-1 Predator is an armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft that has seen action in Iraq, Afghanistan and Yemen. The aircraft is used as an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance asset, and can be used to conduct pattern-of-life analysis, as well as targeted and signature strikes on targets.

‘Similarly, the MQ-9 Reaper can conduct multi-missions, and as a medium-altitude range and long-endurance that is remotely piloted. The Reaper, however, is larger and more heavily-armed than the MQ-1 Predator and is used to conduct time-sensitive strikes on targets.’

Maybe San Diego can use some of that aerial surveillance to supplement its dwindling police presence doing traffic monitoring of motorcycle lane-splitting during rush hour.

General Atomics, Poway, is getting big bucks in 2018.

General Atomics, Poway, is getting big bucks in 2018.

Liberal vs. Conservative Tax Policy

[Politics]

The Real Cost Of Tax Reform

“How can you Swiss people be so docile about paying such high taxes?”

by Rick Steves
[This is a repost from his Facebook Rick Steve’s Europe.]

Rick Steves: "More money than many Americans make in their entire lifetime. That’s what Congressional Republicans are voting to give me as a tax break."

Rick Steves: “More money than many Americans make in their entire lifetime. That’s what Congressional Republicans are voting to give me as a tax break.”

More money than many Americans make in their entire lifetime. That’s what Congressional Republicans are voting to give me as a tax break.

That’s right: If Republicans in Congress get their way, I just saved a couple million dollars on the change in the inheritance tax alone. What about you?

Our government already spends more than it takes in, and this tax giveaway will make it worse. But that plays right into Congressional Republicans’ strategy to shrink the government: First, they cut taxes by $1.5 trillion (mostly benefiting the rich). Then, to balance the budget, they’ll claim that the only solution is to gut programs (such as Social Security and Medicare) designed to protect America’s poor and working class.

I once asked my Swiss friend Olle, “How can you Swiss people be so docile about paying such high taxes?” Without missing a beat, he replied, “Well, what’s it worth to live in a country where there’s no hunger, no homelessness, and where everyone — regardless of the wealth of their parents — has access to quality healthcare and education?”

I believe a national budget is a moral document. It declares who we are as a nation. Decency requires compassion and help for our poor. Stability requires a healthy middle class. The Republican economic agenda both hurts the poor and further weakens our middle class — all to give wealthy people a windfall of cash they don’t need.

So what am I going to do with all of the tax revenue Congressional Republicans want to save me? I’m choosing to provide, as an individual, what European societies would provide collectively: housing for otherwise homeless single mothers and their kids (www.ricksteves.com/about-rick/trinity-place), helping to build senior centers (http://myedmondsnews.com/…/rick-steves-announces-2-million-…), and paying the rent of our local symphony orchestra (https://blog.ricksteves.com/blog/arts-center-donation). These are basic services — not extravagances.

While Republicans might argue that I’m proving their point — that charity from the wealthy will come to the rescue — I believe that such services should be paid for not by the odd millionaire who doesn’t have a taste for golf clubs and yachts, but collectively, through progressive taxation. While lowering my marginal tax rate from 39.6% to 37% will have no impact on my privileged standard of living, it will ultimately have a huge impact on millions of struggling people.

As a proud American and a student of Europe, I care deeply about the cost to the fabric of our society that this windfall for the wealthy will bring. If you believe you’re being represented by a Republican Congressperson who votes for this plan, you are mistaken. It costs them a lot of money to convince you to vote for them, and this tax bill is their way of paying off their major donors. And if I lived in your district, I’d raise bloody hell.

(By the way, our Christmas fundraiser for Bread for the World was a huge success this year, raising more money than ever. Thank you to the 2,376 who contributed, collectively raising $311,700. With my $250,000 match, together we raised $561,700 to empower Bread in its work — to speak up for those who don’t have private lobbyists driving our government to re-write laws in their favor.)

Freemasonry Documentary movie review

[Independent Film]

33 & Beyond

movie review of 33 & Beyond: The Royal Art of Freemasonry

Written and directed by Johnny Royal
Cast: Johnny Royal, Robert Doan, Tom Driber, Ernest Chapman, Chris Sanders, Adam W. Wolf, John Eberle, Matt Dove, Robert J Davis, James Tressner, John Cooper III, R. Stephen Doan, Greg Cherry, Joseph Kindoll, Douglas Roberts, Daniel Hanttula, Adam Kendall, Ryan Driber, Danny Parker, Roni Zulu

review by Reviewer Rob

[“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” opens in Los Angeles tomorrow night, Sunday, December 17 at Laemmle’s Ahyra Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills. The red carpet will begin at 6:30 P.M. after that the film’s start is at 7:30 P.M. promptly.]

There’s an interesting character in mythology that has come to symbolize secrecy. Among the pantheon of ancient gods is Harpocrates. His image is that of a young boy with his finger to his mouth as if he’s signaling the viewer to be silent. The history and interpretations of this ancient Egyptian god and his different Greek and Roman iterations is long and I won’t get too into it here, but his image was sometimes used in meeting halls where confidential business was discussed in the ancient world. Often there was an image of a rose above the door as well, the rose also being a symbol of secrecy.

Anyways, this is a movie review not a history essay and I said I wouldn’t get too into that. But in 33 & Beyond: The Royal Art of Freemasonry, this documentary about a system that holds secrets, the image of someone making the fingers-to-the-lips “silence” signal comes up more than once.

It’s a well made doc, with many talking head expert interviews contributing throughout. As a movie watcher with a keen interest in documentaries of both recent and ancient history, I was hoping for more about the esoteric roots of Freemasonry in Western Civilization. Don’t look for any conspiracy defense here either. Johnny Royal didn’t waste a frame on any of that. This is more of a letter of recognition to the august body of brethren he belongs to. In it director Royal take the viewer through the steps from newly minted initiate to the thirty-second Degree, explaining in detail what each step symbolizes and the transformations they are intended to teach and promote in a man. There’s some personal touches from the cast such as when Johnny Royal (who appears throughout) describes how he lost his fathers and afterward found his way to Freemasonry, gaining needed guidance as a young man and widow’s son.

Freemasonry is described as being relatively non-judgmental of initiates’ different religious backgrounds, requiring only an applicant to have a belief in God and an afterlife (also that you’re not a felon). One of the interviewees describes how energy can not be created or destroyed, implying when something dies the energy contained therein goes somewhere else. That has to be perhaps the broadest description of a belief in an afterlife one can hold.

This documentary is valuable if you want an introduction to the basic structure of Freemasonry. Aside from touching on their penchant for secrecy — or tradition of keeping ways of identifying other Masons “confidential,” as it’s said in the film — 33 & Beyond goes well into the various degrees a member can attain, from Entered Apprentice on up to 32° “Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret”. The fabled Thirty-Third Degree is mentioned as a kind of ceremonial designation that a few fortunate Masons earn. Here is the strength and apparent purpose of this authorized documentary: It demystified the levels of the organization to an extent that a curious outsider with no real knowledge can feel satisfied with. If you’re looking for a great historical compendium of how the Masons helped shape the formation and politics of the United States you may leave unfulfilled. There’s no biographical profiles of any of the countless figures throughout history that have been Freemasons, and certainly no attempt at diminishing any of the shadowy and intriguing conspiracy theories that have popped up about them.

The world premier was Friday, October 13, at The Grand Lodge of California Freemasons in San Francisco. But as mentioned at the top, 33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY plays in L.A. tomorrow night, Sunday, December 17 at Laemmle’s Ahyra Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills. Red carpet starts at 6:30 p.m. and the film starts at 7:30.

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

“33 & BEYOND: THE ROYAL ART OF FREEMASONRY” written and directed by Johnny Royal

R.I.P. Filmmaker Bruce Brown

[dig a hole]

Filmmaker Bruce Brown

A legendary Independent Film Maker has died

by Reviewer Rob

According to a post first seen last night on The Intertia and this afternoon being reported everywhere, the filmmaker who gave us Endless Summer and the motocross flick On Any Sunday has died. I met Bruce Brown at the Action Sports Retailer show in San Diego in 1994 and talked to him, surprised by how down-to-earth he was compared to all the other industry moguls and surf stars with their millionaire cover model ‘tudes that were at the convention center that day. We spoke for a while and he signed an original Endless Summer poster for me. Then pioneer Hawaii big wave surfer Greg Noll walked up and terrified him with a friendly laughing and unexpected bear hug that looked like he’d get crushed by. Bruce Brown was really skinny, maybe 57 years-old at the time, while Noll was in the same age group but maybe between 250 to 300 pounds and beefy. Brown said afterwards, “I need to hang a sign around my neck that says, ‘Do not hug’.” Lol

Legendary Filmmaker Bruce Brown (December 1, 1937 – December 10, 2017)

Legendary Filmmaker Bruce Brown (December 1, 1937 – December 10, 2017)

Legendary Filmmaker Bruce Brown (December 1, 1937 – December 10, 2017)

Legendary Filmmaker Bruce Brown (December 1, 1937 – December 10, 2017)

Legendary Filmmaker Bruce Brown (December 1, 1937 – December 10, 2017)

Legendary Filmmaker Bruce Brown (December 1, 1937 – December 10, 2017)

Prospector: Sifting The New Economy

[Development]

The Future

Prospector: The Shining City.

Prospector: The Shining City.

[This repost is from a new venue that I’ve opened up and I’d like to formally introduce. Prospector will be a place where we’ll discuss the strange and complicated shifts that are occurring in our society regarding an often taboo subject, making money. Writers, bloggers, and analysts are invited to join in the discussion. But what I am really interested in are the views of participants in this new economy. While I intend to keep REVIEWER MAGAZINE focused on reviews and news of arts and entertainment, with some political analysis — as it has been for over 20 years — PROSPECTOR will be about economic issues. If you are a bold explorer and a risk taker in any money-making venture, or an entrepreneur with a new idea, contact me at Editor@ProspectorMagazine.com. ~RR]

Gates’ Tech City On A Hill

In The Arizona Desert Bill Gates Plans A Master Tech Community

by Reviewer Rob, originally posted at Prospector

I saw a click-bait article on my Facebook feed today and rather than follow it down its link rabbit hole I googled the main headline points and came up with this story, and then this story here about how Bill Gates recently bought 25,000 acres of desert sand, rock, and cactus in Tonopah, Arizona, for 80 million dollars and plans to turn it into a city with smart cars and other high tech features: ‘…Gates could do what Disney could not, because he has more control over the outcome, and because technology has advanced to a level that makes the overall vision more viable.’

Gates’ shining city in the desert will be called Belmont.

One news site quotes the Gates-owned real estate company who organized the purchase, Belmont Partners, as saying in a press release, “Belmont will create a forward-thinking community with a communication and infrastructure spine that embraces cutting-edge technology, designed around high-speed digital networks, data centres, new manufacturing technologies and distribution models, autonomous vehicles and autonomous logistics hubs”.

While this master plan can and should be replicated elsewhere, my first thought was, “Who’s going to provide the nightclubs and entertainment for the geeks?”

Okay, no seriously, what a great idea. Do you know how much BLM land may be freed up for development in the next three to seven years if Trump gets his way? Isn’t 95 percent of Nevada federal land that’s basically unused? Think of all the mega-casinos and convention centers that could be built.

And what about all the Appalachian towns and Rust-Belt cities in the Northeast that are dying because industry left them? Some smart tech billionaire could approach their city planners and say, “Right, let me invest all this money in your tired but scrappy little old town and I’ll turn it into a high-technology burg of the future with free high-speed internet for all but you give me and my company bargain basement deals and zoning rights on all the real estate you have for sale and 50 percent of all the returns your town makes in productivity and profit for the next fifty years.”

Or something like that. You get the idea. There is SO MUCH investment potential in vast swathes of this gigantic country if more people with the means like Bill Gates were allowed to take the chance. Positive change would happen fast!

1898 50-cent U.S. postal Western Mining Prospector: This design was taken from a drawing by Frederic Remington, entitled “The Gold Bug.” It pictures an old prospector, who, with two pack burros, makes his way through mountain country in search of riches.

1898 50-cent U.S. postal Western Mining Prospector: This design was taken from a drawing by Frederic Remington, entitled “The Gold Bug.” It pictures an old prospector, who, with two pack burros, makes his way through mountain country in search of riches.

Classic Yet Unique Wedding Photos

Trash The Dress

 

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

Sometimes my brides and grooms ask for a different kind of wedding photography. The “Trash The Dress” shoot is one such instance. Wedding dresses are usually very well made and clean really well. This may not be for everyone but for the bold and adventurous a post-ceremony trash the dress photo shoot is a way to declare your independence from social norms that restrict.

~RR

"Trash The Dress" post-wedding shoot.

“Trash The Dress” post-wedding shoot.

"Trash The Dress" post-wedding shoot.

“Trash The Dress” post-wedding shoot.

In California Wedding Season Is Year-Round

Vacation-Destination Wedding Photography

 

Due to our weather and fine economy San Diego and Southern California’s wedding season is all year long.

words and photos by me, Reviewer Rob

As you may know, dear reader, we here at Reviewer Magazine will do pretty much anything legal for money. If you can be paid decently to do it and and not get in trouble, then hey, this is 2017 and we’re all about meeting those bills.

I began shooting photos in my early twenties back in the late-1980’s and was asked to shoot weddings from the start. Over the last ten years I’ve elevated my event coverage and portraiture to world-class levels and include wedding packages that combine artistry and journalistic techniques in a very unique style.

Contact me through the Beautiful Wedding Photos website or email Robert@BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com to inquire about availability and secure your wedding date. I’d be delighted to record your special day just the way you want.

~Robert

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com

FWSD Allison Andrews video interview

[Fashion]

Allison Andrews, FWSD

video interview with Allison Andrews, the mind and heart behind Fashion Week San Diego

by Reviewer Rob

Fresh off the huge success of the 10-year anniversary of Fashion Week San Diego, Allison Andrews sat for an interview with Reviewer TV. FWSD was a ginormous event that was met with much media coverage and attendance, and as we found out, her energy and creativity is matched only by her heart and deep understanding for and of the business of fashion. But for her fashion is more than a business, it’s a calling and a lifestyle.

Allison Andrews Talks Fashion Week San Diego from Reviewer on Vimeo.

Bio:

Allison Andrews is founder and director of Fashion Week San Diego® (FSWD),president of APA Business Consulting and executive director of FAB Authority. As well as a professor at Palomar College in the fashion department. A passionate entrepreneur, Andrews founded FSWD in 2007, growing the year-long event to become one of the biggest and most prominent Southern California events, and the only bi-national Fashion Week in the world.

Prior to launching FWSD, Andrews founded APA Business Consulting, a consulting firm that supports startups and entrepreneurs with business, brand development, marketing and sales strategies. She started the company in 2005, at the age of 20. In 2015, she also launched the FAB Authority, a non-for-profit organization, providing resources and events for emerging artists, designers and beauty industry professionals.

Andrews’ passion for helping and empowering others is apparent in all that she touches. In addition to her full-time commitments with FWSD, APA Business Consulting and the FAB Authority, Andrews is an active community member, sitting on the board of several not-for-profit organizations and donating her time to support others. She serves as a Board member and longtime volunteer for Rancho Coastal Humane Society (13 years), and is a volunteer and donor for Love on a Leash pet therapy and sits on the advisory panel of Vanguard Culture as well as the advisory panel for the Palomar Fashion College. A recognized and respected industry thought leader, Andrews speaks frequently at various San Diego events, led by professional organizations, as well as local colleges, graduations, networking events, seminars and other fashion events. In 2013, she was selected as a finalist for San Diego Business Journal’s Women Who Mean Business Awards. This is among the over fifty recognitions and awards she has for her work.

Andrews holds an Associate of Arts degree in Merchandise Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising and a Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership from National University. When she isn’t busy growing FWSD and propelling fashion careers, she enjoys spending time with her husband, daughter and nine rescue animals in the coastal town of Encinitas, California.


Fashion Week San Diego grand catwalk.