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lens goals: Telephoto autofocus

[Photolog]

Telephoto Adventures

in the market now for professional glass

by Robert Rowsey

So now I need a telephoto that’s autofocus, at least 600mm, maybe 800 or even 1000mm. Here’s a pic I shot this morning of some dude at the Shores goofing around in the small surf on his longboard. He started out surfing it regularfoot but then dropped down to a seated Quasimoto or whatever. I broke out the old Sigma analog 600 f4 and set up with the tripod on the concrete boardwalk. In doing this I quickly discovered — I need to get a modern telephoto lens if I’m going to do any action sports photography. Unlike the shoot at Windansea last week with my Tamron 200 which had plenty of “tack sharp” crispness, these pics were all hit-and-miss. This shot was among the as-good-as-it-gets cetegory:

La Jolla Shores, 11-6-18.
La Jolla Shores, 11-6-18.

In the early 80’s I was out of high school and toying with the idea of contributing to the at that time many surfing magazines being published. Actually in the US there was only Ing, Out, and Er — which were Surfing Magazine, Breakout Magazine, and Surfer Magazine. George Salvadore, who was the editor at the Carlsbad-based Breakout Magazine at the time told me the formula for shooting surfing. It was this: use ASA 64 Kodachrome “Red” slide film, and shoot f4 at 250th of a second or faster. That was it. Today the technology’s improved so much you can shoot at a much higher ISO and stopped down for a larger depth of field and still get good results. But that’s what you had to do back then.

I do like my antique glass though. I’ll hang on to my 40 year-old Sigma monster 600. You can’t turn that tight focusing collar fast enough to stay on a rider but boy does it look impressive mounted on a ‘pod.

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Wedding Season Is Coming

Vacation-Destination Wedding Photography

 

Due to our weather and fine economy San Diego and Southern California’s wedding season is all year long.

words and photos by me, Reviewer Rob

As you may know, dear reader, we here at Reviewer Magazine will do pretty much anything legal for money. If you can be paid decently to do it and and not get in trouble, then hey, this is 2017 and we’re all about meeting those bills.

I began shooting photos in my early twenties back in the late-1980’s and was asked to shoot weddings from the start. Over the last ten years I’ve elevated my event coverage and portraiture to world-class levels and include wedding packages that combine artistry and journalistic techniques in a very unique style.

Contact me through the Beautiful Wedding Photos website or email Robert@BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com to inquire about availability and secure your wedding date. I’d be delighted to record your special day just the way you want.

~Robert

BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
BeautifulWeddingPhotos.com
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Americana Dance Hall

[Photo log]

The Grand Old Office

The Americana dance and music scene

words and photos by Reviewer Rob

One night a month The Office on 30th Street in San Diego (the classic old completely remodeled Scolari’s Office space, remember?) turns into a country-western honky tonk now and it’s a free for all on stage as local talent does their best Americana version of classic like Merle, Hank, Johnny, and others, as well as some originals. Bring a cowboy hat and drink Jack straight.

The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
The Grand Old Office
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Photolog: Supermoon, 11-13-16

[Photolog]

SUPERMOON!

by Reviewer Rob

This photo was shot about an hour and a half ago at 6:05 p.m., from a parking lot up on a hilltop overlooking a freeway in north metro San Diego. The area directly in front of me below the plane of the moon was relatively free of urban and streetlight pollution, although there were some office parks about one mile away with similar light like the ones to my left and right in the parking lot I was in. I was using my Asahi Pentax 600mm f/4.5-f/45 fixed focal length lens on my Nikon D5300 set at ISO 100. I had the lens set at f/16.5, and shutter speed for this photo was 1/500 sec. There was some slight haze but it was overall a cloudless and clear night. Two days ago there was much drier conditions with a true Santa Ana. Too bad the Supermoon didn’t get scheduled for then.

This was the last of a series of 22 photos, and I used escalating shutter speeds from 200th up each notch to 500th, settling on 1/500th because my tripod is a little wiggly with a long lens. The faster shutter I shot it at the more crisp the image appeared in my viewfinder.

The RAW image was adjusted in Photoshop CC and then cropped out to isolate it in the field. Then I monochromed it to take out all the color. It’s dark, to highlight detail, but hey it’s the moon. It looks better dark and spooky.

Behold the Supermoon, 11-13-2016.

Edit b, same photo.
Edit b, same photo.
Photolog: Supermoon, 11-13-16, by Reviewer Rob.
Photolog: Supermoon, 11-13-16, by Reviewer Rob.

From theindependent.co.uk:

‘Known as the Beaver Moon or Frost Moon, this one will be exceptionally large and bring higher than normal tides.

“The full moon of Nov. 14 is not only the closest full moon of 2016 but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century,” Nasa said in a statement, adding the full moon will not come this close to Earth again until 25 November 2034.’