COMMUNICATE

Send a message.
Ask, advise, comment, volunteer, inform, gripe, complain, threaten or pester... Send us at REVIEWER MAGAZINE your tender love note. Want to be heard? You can!
:::

Reviewer TV


Watch:

Vimeo
Youtube


:::

Join Us, Won’t You?

ReviewerTV
Subscriptions

$5 per month or $40 per year, recurring, you can cancel easily at any time:


Memberships: monthly or annual, cancel easily any time.



:::

Reviewer TV

Members Videos

:::

In Print

PDFs of recent issues of Reviewer Magazine in print:

#50,

#49,

#48,

#47,

#46,

#45,

#44,

#43,

#42,

#41

#40,

#39,

#38

:::

Most Recent Items

Reviewer TV

Members Videos

:::

In Print

PDFs of recent issues of Reviewer Magazine in print:

#50,

#49,

#48,

#47,

#46,

#45,

#44,

#43,

#42,

#41

#40,

#39,

#38

:::

CD review: DEAD AISLING

Dead Aisling

by Megan Trihey

Dead Aisling’s flawlessly melodic, hauntingly hypnotic self-titled debut album is an essential trip for music connoisseurs who have been begging for a virgin sound amid this year’s painfully mainstream batch of bands.

The album’s first track introduces you to lead singer Adam Richmond’s forcefully gentle voice that will bite your ear one moment only to caress it the next.

Without warning, you’re launched into “Blood and Family,” the second track, a furiously catchy song that, while heavy, invites head-banging and table-top dancing.

If you’ve never been scared by an intensely dark and alluring song, turn off the lights and listen to track three.

The chorus of the fourth track, “Song for a Darkened Sky,” will inhabit the caverns of your brain for days and you still won’t get sick of it. The smooth electronic melody pushes the band past punk, goth, or rock into a genre that has yet to be coined.

The soft, organic guitar carries track five from one growling verse to the next and is another one that will likely find its way into the depths of your memory and remain there.

On the album’s seventh track, hyperactive barking drums battle the axe for attention and, at just over four minutes long, ends way too soon.

The final track is a song turned into an unforgettable story that will give your feet a break, but not your mind.

After listening to all eight tracks on the album in less than 40 minutes, play it again because if you missed one word or note, you probably missed the point.

myspace.com/deadaisling

-MKT

You must be logged in to post a comment.